Tag Archives: RIF

The Speech

“So, what do you really do?” has become a  frequently asked question since Corporate Elements was launched less than two weeks ago. My elevator speech is still evolving, but here is the original version:

I primarily offer coaching and development services. But the essence of my job is to partner with you to make you and your organization successful!

When it comes to working with individuals, I do this through assessment, coaching and leadership development. In situations that involve more than one person I provide facilitation, investigation, conflict resolution and training. When it comes to organizations, I offer a partnership to either:

a)      set or define a direction through services such as strategic planning or defining a strategic foundation (mission, vision, values), or

b)      develop or implement systems, processes or projects to execute on the existing strategy. This can be the researching or implementing technology such as an LMS or HRIS, supporting developing and implementing leadership development programs, conducting a comparative culture analysis, supporting M&A or a staff reduction, or developing and implementing a succession plan.

I tested this approach at a Chamber event earlier this week and, as you may already have guessed, quickly realized that my elevator speech will need some refinement. There are far too many words, and I struggled to hold people’s attention after the second sentence. Words like “successful” and “partnership” are too vague and may be perceived to be somewhat pretentious, despite the earnest intent that lies behind. So I will need to put some more thought into how I present myself.

The value in my work lies in recognizing what you, the customer, are concerned about and to help you grasp, rephrase and develop your thoughts, concerns, and goals into something that can be acted on, implemented, managed or achieved.

I would much rather listen to you talk about what concerns or excites you, than give you a speech that supposedly encompasses all that I can do.

So when we meet next time and you ask me what I do, maybe I will limit my answer to “coaching and development. So what do you do?” I would love to hear more about it.

Help, we’re acquiring a company! Now what?

No, Corporate Elements has not entered M&A mode. But this is a fairly common scenario when an executive team of a small to medium sized company “realize” they have been successful in their quest to acquire another entity. Most of the efforts up until this point has been focused on the financial side of the equation, combined with gathering business intelligence and building vital relations and buy-in from stakeholders.

Now the scary reality hits you – how do we make “them” part of “us”?

This is a defining moment – one where a number of things can begin to go “wrong.” Or it can mark a point where the foundation is laid for a successful outcome  – building synergies, expertise and human capital, increasing market share, or improving productivity and the bottom line. The stakes are high, and everyone’s eyes are on you, their leader. Here are ten things you can do to dramatically increase the odds of a good integration process:

  1. Be clear on what you want to accomplish, as outlined in your vision and strategic plan. You’d be surprised how many companies don’t have a comprehensive strategic plan for the coming one, three, and five year period. The number of companies that don’t have a plan that includes acquired entities is of course even higher. If you don’t have a working plan, you need to act fast.
  2. Be clear on what the existing and future strategic foundation is, i.e. your corporate mission and values. Be ready to express this in clear and simple terms, and to exemplify what the specific operational impact of key principles has in the various areas and levels of the organization.
  3. Assemble a truly great integration team. This needs to be the best of the best, representing every critical operational area, and they have to be able to commit for the duration of the integration period. Make sure the team members fully understand their mandate and operational goals, the resources they have available to them, the timeframe for accomplishing the defined KPIs, and the executive team/ steering committee’s role and responsibility in helping the team accomplish their mandate.
  4. Conduct a comparative culture analysis showing where the similarities and differences are greatest between your organization and the acquired entity. This may seem like a utopian goal to many, yet it is an invaluable tool and completely realistic if the professionals you select have the required foresight and experience.  The initial weeks of the post-merger integration will often seem chaotic and confusing, and having a model that provides guidance and helps you provide focus and prioritize your goals and resources will be extremely helpful.
  5. Brainstorm a clear and effective communication plan and get the commitment from all main stakeholders to stick to it throughout the integration process. Why can’t you  just “wing it”? Review any study of mergers and you will find that this is one of, if not the most important reason why integration processes derail. A poorly designed and executed communication plan will in many cases cause unnecessary delay and frustration, not to mention unforeseen cost. The worst case scenario is that it can threaten the integration process altogether.
  6. Know the critical work streams and tasks before setting foot in the door (or, have a “don’t get caught with your pants down” plan). Have a Day-1 readiness action plan that will secure smooth business transactions in critical areas. Know what you will need to have operational on day one and have a plan for how to make that happen before entering  the building. Focus solely on take-over day, align with key stakeholders onsite.
  7. Be ready to tell them who to turn to within your organization to get things done. Make a list with the names, contact information and detailed responsibilities of the people within your organization who have the role and authority to resolve issues and keep things flowing. Don’t give anyone any excuse for sitting on their hands instead of working because they don’t know who can get their computer or email up and running, or answer benefit questions regarding a dependent who is sick, or who can authorize the purchase of a new office chair because the old one broke.
  8. Be prepared that nobody is going to hear what you are saying, at least not during the initial time after you come onsite. People will be confused, stressed, and they may feel threatened or angry. They will not be ready to hear how the integration process will bring great things. But don’t be misled to think that communication is a waste of time, on the contrary. Be ready to over-communicate like you have never done before. Provide the same important information in as many ways you can – in person, in emails, on their intranet, in frequent briefings and town-hall meetings, by using posters or stickers, or by any other way you can imagine. Do what you can to fill any possible void where disinformation and rumors may find fertile ground. You will not be able to prevent the rumor mill, but frequent and persistent communication literally to the point where people get sick of listening to you will keep it to a minimum.
  9. Stay focused on item number one, your vision and plan for what you want to accomplish. Never lose sight of that, and resist the temptation to compromise or lower your expectations! Remember to use the managers and supervisors within the organization to spread the message and resolve issues. If you are effective in getting them to see your vision and understand their role in it, they will be are your greatest allies. Ignore them or treat them unfairly, and they will be your Achilles heal throughout the process.
  10. Be understanding and merciful towards all employees and managers during the stressful integration process, but hold everyone accountable for being adult human beings who are themselves responsible for building their new future. Be a good listener, but don’t allow negative behavior and opinions to fester. Maintain your authority and focus in a gentle, yet professional and effective manner.

Corporate Elements has the experience and expertise to be your partner and help guide your organization through the M&A process. This will allow you and your employees to focus more of your time and energy on making sure that the integration does not disrupt critical business operations  and existing customer relationships.

M&A RELATED PRODUCTS AND SERVICES:

  • Comparative cultural assessment
  • Strategic planning
  • Mission, Vision, Values
  • M&A planning and project management
  • Leadership development
  • Coaching
  • Training
  • Performance management
  • Conflict resolution
  • Group facilitation
  • Investigation
  • Personality and professional assessments
  • Succession management
  • Learning and development systems and design
  • HRIS/Learning/Talent Management system implementation
  • Organizational Assessment
  • Lean/continuous improvement
  • RIF/Career transition

CORPORATE ELEMENTS WILL:

  1. ASSESS the current situation, the impact it has on the organization, and the desired outcome.
  2. DEVELOP a proposal for further action and work with you to determine reasonable and specific outcome measures.
  3. IMPLEMENT the course of action that was agreed upon
  4. SUCCEED in meeting or exceeding the outcome measures that were agreed upon.

OUR GUARANTEE:

The mission of Corporate Elements is to deliver quality products and services that optimize the performance, productivity and profitability of your organization. We guarantee that we will consistently meet or exceed your expectations and the outcomes we have developed together.

Turning conflict into performance

Conflict. How does the word make you feel? Does it make you feel slightly uncomfortable? Does it make you think of certain unpleasant situations or people?

Now instead think of your favorite soap opera or drama series – what is it called, who are the main characters, and can you tell me what happened during the last episode?

Does thinking of the show make you feel the same way as the word “conflict”? No?

Nobody enjoys conflict, at least not when they are personally involved in it. Conflict drains your energy when you’d much rather focus on other more important things. Nevertheless, conflict is widely present in any workplace, every day.

“Work” is one of the few places where people literally have to coexist and get along on an ongoing basis, whether they want to or not. You can’t choose your coworkers. Modern society and technology has allowed us to limit the times and situations where we have to be codependent on people who are different from us in their backgrounds, beliefs, behavior and perspectives. We avoid people who are different and who irritate us, and seek those who we feel comfortable with and want to be with. Except at work, where we have to deal with coworkers, team members, supervisors, customers and vendors. So many of us are out of practice on how to deal with conflict in a positive way!

Conflict surrounds us everywhere we go. Getting the kids ready for school, your feeling of anger when a driver cuts in front of you on your way to work, or when you have to work late because someone else hasn’t finished their work as promised. So how do you deal with it? What ticks you off? How aware are you regarding your own behavior, how it affects the people around you?

I have worked with conflict for quite a few years. As an outsider, I am able to help people find solutions that allow them to move on and focus on their work. For example when I mediated a conflict between two coworkers who shared an office but who reported not having spoken to each other for the last three years. I was called in because their manager wanted to terminate them both, but he wanted to try to find a solution one last time. Can you imagine working in such an hostile environment every day for three years? It took a few minutes of me asking them questions and facilitating an exchange of information before we discovered that the conflict was based on a misunderstanding. One person was thought to have prevented the other from receiving a promotion. They were both embarrassed to find out this was not what really happened, but relieved to be able to move on.

It is gratifying to be allowed to work with conflict. Conflict provides fertile ground for making positive change. As an outsider, I am able to bring the authority needed to create a safe environment and bring people to the table, allow them to share information and listen to what the other has to say, and assist in the discovery of how each party has something to gain from moving on and finding ways to prevent similar situations from happening in the future.

Instead of having a situation where everyone loses in the end, I am able to turn it into a win-win.

Corporate Elements has the experience and expertise to resolve conflict situations within your organization, allowing precious time and resources to be devoted to the future and success of the company, its employees and stakeholders. It saves you time, money, and energy, making for a much more enjoyable time at work – for everyone.

CONFLICT RESOLUTION RELATED PRODUCTS AND SERVICES:

  • Mediation
  • Coaching
  • Training
  • Group facilitation
  • Investigation
  • Organizational Assessment
  • Leadership development
  • Performance management
  • RIF/Career transition
  • Succession Management

 CORPORATE ELEMENTS WILL:

  1. ASSESS the current situation, the impact it has on the organization, and the desired outcome.
  2. DEVELOP a proposal for further action and work with you to determine reasonable and specific outcome measures.
  3. IMPLEMENT the course of action that was agreed upon.
  4. SUCCEED in meeting or exceeding the outcome measures that were agreed upon.

 OUR GUARANTEE:

The mission of Corporate Elements is to deliver quality products and services that optimize the performance, productivity and profitability of your organization. We guarantee that we will consistently meet or exceed your expectations and the outcomes we have developed together.